Guild-Only Editing Rates

I get asked a lot about my rates for editing projects destined for the DM’s Guild. In the interest of having them out there and available, here they are:

Provided you send me a Word file, I use “Track Changes” to cover the following:

  • Spelling
  • Punctuation
  • Grammar
  • Spacing
  • Capitalization
  • Syntax (sentence structure & readability)
  • Style
  • Clarity
  • Removing repetition & simple wording
  • Correcting passive voice
  • Quality feedback & suggestions to improve your manuscript
  • I make a first pass like a beta-reader. If I find a plot or rules hole, I’ll tell you and make suggestions toward fixing them. Then I’ll dig into the copy editing.

Pertinent to the last entry, you also get one revision per hole. For example, if I do the beta-reading and copy editing, and you write 500 more words to plug a hole I found before I finish the copy editing, I’ll copy-edit the new material and those words don’t count toward the word count from which I calculate the fee.

I return the annotated DOC file so you can see what I did, as well as commentary and suggestions. If it looks good, all you have to do is turn off the comments and send the text to layout.

All that for US$4 per 500 words, which is 20% off my everyone-not-Guild-creators rates. That comes out to a little less than $2 per page of plain text.

If all you need is proofreading for spelling, capitalization, and punctuation, it’s US$2.50 per 500 words, which is half off my usual rate.

If this is something which interests you, hit the Contact link and let’s talk.

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Hit Points – Abstraction?

It happens every couple of weeks, it seems. Someone posts somewhere lamenting about hit points in D&D and how they don’t make sense. An argument ensues about what hit points really mean.

These arguments are almost always as poorly informed and poorly thought through as they are passionate.

Here are my thoughts on it, collated into an essay because I like writing essays and I’m getting sick of writing the same stuff over and over.

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Massive new compilation released!

I’m very, very happy to be a part of “A Fistful of Coppers” – a compilation of more than 800 pages of best-selling D&D content from some of the best-known independent gaming writers.

There’s adventures, character options, DM’s tools, you name it! Literally dozens of hours of entertainment are in this compilation, each and every page of which is a highly-regarded best-seller.

The best part? It’s more than TWO THIRDS OFF the cover price if you bought each product individually.

 You can get your copy here.
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Just released! A guide to being a good player!
I just released a new thing: “I Want To Try! Tips on becoming a better player” is live now and shipping on the Guild.
 
There is tons of helpful information out there about how to be a better DM. Books, websites, blogs, Youtube video series, you name it. I’ve noticed, however, that there is precious little about how to be a better D&D player. This monograph seeks to address that lack, if only slightly, and in a more-than-slightly opinionated way.
 
It is based on more than 30 years of experience playing D&D and other tabletop roleplaying games, as well as observations about basic human nature and inspiration from such luminaries as Kenneth Hite, Robin Laws, Dawnforgedcast, Matthew Mercer, Geek & Sundry, Matt Colville, “DnD” and “RPG” on Reddit, con panels, and many more I can’t possibly remember.
 
This is the companion volume to my best-selling “You Can Try: Tips on becoming a better DM.”
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Tips for DMs Series – Critical Fail?

If a natural 20 is OMGTOTALLYRAD, a natural 1 should suck. That’s what most D&D people these days say, right? Roll a 1, something bad happens. What’s the problem with that?

It’s stupid, that’s the problem.

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Tips for DMs Series – Manage Expectations

Manage expectations. This is the first and fundamental mission you have as a Dungeon Master.

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Reviews are awesome!

Chris Bissette over at Loot The Room was kind enough to include “Spells of Kara-Tur” in his most recent set of DM’s Guild reviews, and he liked it! Good reviews are always good, and a good review from a great reviewer is even better.

There’s a bunch of other great products reviewed in that list, too, so go take a look.

 

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Tips for DMs – Passive skills?

The Skills section of Ability Scores portion of the PHB gives a rule for Passive Checks. This is usually only ever used with Perception; there’s even a special spot on every character sheet I’ve ever seen for passive Perception.

That doesn’t make a whole lot of sense to me. If Perception can have a passive score, why not Insight? Why not Nature?

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Fudging die rolls – good or bad?

It’s a common question in gaming discussions online. Should I, as the DM, fudge die rolls? It crops up with distressing frequency. I have a standard answer, and I’m sick of typing it out over and over again, so I decided I’d toss it on my blog and refer to that from now on.

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Spells from Kara-Tur JUST RELEASED!

I’ve been working on this for a while now, and I’m really excited about it.

One night weeks and weeks ago, I had just gone to bed, and on a goof pulled my original copy of AD&D’s Oriental Adventures to re-read for about the 10,923rd time.

Leaving aside the casual racism of the title (it was the early 1980s, and we’re talking about Gary Gygax, here), I discovered there’s a ton of great material in there begging to be converted to 5e. I started dreaming about stuff  from Oriental Adventures I could convert/create, test, and release on the DMs Guild.

Of course, I’m not the first to think of this. There’s a slew of really awesome Asian-flavored 5e products on the Guild, as I discovered the following morning. But what the hell, I thought. I didn’t see any specifically spell-related material, and little in direct conversion from the AD&D book, so I decided to go ahead with it.

(You should really do yourself a favor and go check out stuff like Marc Altfuldisch’s material. Dang.)

This is the first product I’ve made using NaturalCrit’s “The Homebrewery.” If you want to make stuff that’s visually very, very similar to WotC’s hardbacks, this is the way to go. It’s nowhere near as powerful as InDesign or even Word, but I think that’s one of its strengths — its simplicity means the learning curve is much more palatable.

Go check out Spells from Kara-Tur. If you need cool spells for your 5e game, you’ll have quite a few to pick from.

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